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Extract from Desserts • By Editors of Food & Wine • Published by GMC Publications

About

Cost
$ $ $ $ $
Difficulty
• • • • •
Time
30 mins

Desserts
MAKES 2 dozen
TIME Active 30 min; Total 1 hr plus cooling

NOTE
Matcha is Japanese powdered green tea. It’s available at Asian markets, large grocery stores and from amazon.com.

Cookbook author Ben Mims makes these not-too-sweet cookies with a soft, cake-like
texture. The “it” ingredient matcha—an antioxidant-rich green tea powder—gives
the cookies a beautiful color and a light, toasty flavor.

Posted by GMC Group Published See GMC Group's 279 projects » © 2018 Editors of Food & Wine / GMC Publications · Reproduced with permission. · Desserts by the Editors of Food & Wine, published by Oxmoor House (£25.00, available from www.thegmcgroup.com)
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  • Step 1

    In a medium bowl, whisk the flour, baking powder, salt and cardamom. In another bowl, whisk the granulated sugar, oil, eggs and vanilla and almond extracts.
    In a small bowl, stir 2 tablespoons of the matcha powder with 2 tablespoons of water, then stir into the wet ingredients. Stir the wet ingredients into the flour
    mixture just until combined.

  • Step 2

    Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Using a 1-ounce ice cream scoop or 2 tablespoons, scoop 1-inch balls of dough at least 2 inches apart onto the prepared sheets; refrigerate for at least 20 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350°.

  • Step 3

    Bake the cookies for about 10 minutes, until set at the edges and very lightly browned on the bottoms. Let the cookies cool on the sheets for 10 minutes, then
    transfer to a rack to cool completely.

  • Step 4

    Arrange the cookies on 1 baking sheet . In a sieve, combine the confectioners’ sugar with the remaining 1 teaspoon of matcha. Dust over the cookies and serve.

    MAKE AHEAD
    The cookies can be stored in an airtight container for up to 3 days. Dust with the matcha sugar before serving.

    “ The sweet grassiness of the green tea powder pairs perfectly with the almond and vanilla, but don’t use your super-expensive, hand-carried-from-Japan matcha . Most respected tea companies now sell a less expensive culinary-grade matcha for baking.”
    —JULIA HEFFELFINGER, ASSOCIATE FOOD EDITOR

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