About

Cost
$ $ $ $ $
Difficulty
• • • •
Time
3h00

How I make my liquid soap
In a world where all of your shower gels and body washes and your bubble baths are full of sodium laurel sulphate or sulfoacetate, its really quite refreshing to see natural liquid soaps available on the market. My liquid soaps are usually a recipe of sunflower, coconut oils, some squalane, and wholesome glycerin. Sometimes I formulate recipes with shea butter and mango butters, absolutely divine! My liquid soaps are cooked a minimum of 8 hours, and then diluted with distilled water for 48 hours. The difference in liquid soap from solid soap is the type of lye used. For solid bars sodium hydroxide is used (NaOH) and for a liquid soap potassium hydroxide (KOH) is used. I know the word lye scares people, but rest assure that a properly made soap of any kind contains no lye after the entire process is over. I will post some info about how lye+ water+ oils turns into the creamy bubbly suds that we all love! Here’s the liquid soap process from start to finish.

Posted by ZAJA Natural from Cleveland, Ohio, United States • Published See ZAJA Natural's 3 projects »
PrintEmbed
  • How to make a liquid soap. Liquid Soap - Step 1
    Step 1

    I weigh out everything I need, my lye, water, and my oils:

  • How to make a liquid soap. Liquid Soap - Step 2
    Step 2

    Then I mix my lye into my water (always mix lye into water, mixing water into the lye is very dangerous):

  • How to make a liquid soap. Liquid Soap - Step 3
    Step 3

    Pour my lye into my oils (never the other way around, it might explode!)

  • How to make a liquid soap. Liquid Soap - Step 4
    Step 4

    I grab my stick blender and start mixing it all together:

  • How to make a liquid soap. Liquid Soap - Step 5
    Step 5

    Once it thickens up, I transfer the mix to my crock pot and start cooking:

  • How to make a liquid soap. Liquid Soap - Step 6
    Step 6

    The soap will go through many phases as it cooks. These are the stages every 10 minutes or so:

    1

  • How to make a liquid soap. Liquid Soap - Step 7
    Step 7

    2

  • How to make a liquid soap. Liquid Soap - Step 8
    Step 8

    3

  • How to make a liquid soap. Liquid Soap - Step 9
    Step 9

    4

  • How to make a liquid soap. Liquid Soap - Step 10
    Step 10

    Once the soap gets to that taffy stage, I can leave it alone to cook for awhile.

  • How to make a liquid soap. Liquid Soap - Step 11
    Step 11

    After about 30 minutes the soap starts to look like applesauce:

  • How to make a liquid soap. Liquid Soap - Step 12
    Step 12

    The milky looking part is water that needs to be stirred back in periodically:

  • How to make a liquid soap. Liquid Soap - Step 13
    Step 13

    At this point I want to test and see if my soap is done. I boil a bit of distilled water and drop some of the soap paste into it. If it ends up clear, its done. If it is milky, it means not all of the oils have been coupled with lye, which also means there is still active lye in the soap:

  • How to make a liquid soap. Liquid Soap - Step 14
    Step 14

    So on with the cooking. I usually just leave my crock pot on low overnight and leave it alone. In the morning the soap is fully done. At this point I add any herbal botanicals, extra glycerin, etc. The soap is 100% done at this point, and all the lye has converted the oils to soap:

  • How to make a liquid soap. Liquid Soap - Step 15
    Step 15

    You may be thinking to yourself, well that does not look like liquid soap.

  • How to make a liquid soap. Liquid Soap - Step 16
    Step 16

    This is where I dilute my soap with a measured amount of boiling distilled water:

  • How to make a liquid soap. Liquid Soap - Step 17
    Step 17

    After about 48 hours my soap is fully diluted and poured right back into the distilled water bottles:

  • How to make a liquid soap. Liquid Soap - Step 18
    Step 18

    The soap is then left to “sequester” which is a fancy term for cure for a minimum of 6 weeks. After 6 weeks, I offer it for sale:

Made this project? Share your version »

Comments

Vicky S.
Vicky S. · Stanley, North Carolina, US
Did you use Potassium Hydroxide? or Sodium Hydroxide?
Reply
Jane  C.
Jane C. · 11 projects
Wow this is so cool, but how much of everything do you use ingredient-wise?
Reply
ZAJA Natural
ZAJA Natural · Cleveland, Ohio, US · 3 projects
You're welcome!
Reply
Cat Morley
Cat Morley · London, GB · 1428 projects
Great how-to, thanks for that!
Reply