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About this project
Published

Time
Time:1h00
Difficulty
Pretty Easy

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Sewing-box staples.

These sewing-box staples are just as sweet as a garden-grown tomatoes, and you don't have to wait until summer to enjoy them. For pincushions with symmetrical shapes, begin at step 1; start at step 3 for cushions with the uneven contours common in heirloom varieties.

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Crafts

Extract from

Martha Stewart's Encyclopedia of Sewing and Fabric Crafts: Basic Techniques for Sewing, Applique, Embroidery, Quilting, Dyeing, and Printing, plus 150 Inspired Projects from A to Z by Martha Stewart Living Magazine

Published by Potter Craft

Whether you just bought your first sewing machine or have been sewing for years, Martha Stewart’s Encyclopedia of Sewing and Fabric Crafts will open your eyes to an irresistible range of ideas. A comprehensive visual reference, the book covers everything a home sewer craves: the basics of sewing by hand or machine, along with five other time-honored crafts techniques, and step-by-step instructions for more than 150 projects that reflect not only Martha Stewart’s depth of experience and crafting expertise, but also her singular sense of style.
 
Encyclopedic in scope, the book features two main parts to help you brush up on the basics and take your skills to a new level. First, the Techniques section guides readers through Sewing, Appliqué, Embroidery, Quilting, Dyeing, and Printing. Following that, the Projects A to Z section features more than 150 clever ideas (including many no-sew projects), all illustrated and explained with the clear, detailed instructions that have become a signature of Martha Stewart’s  magazines, books, and television shows.
 
An enclosed CD includes full-size clothing patterns as well as templates that can be easily produced on a home printer. Fabric, thread, and tool glossaries identify the properties, workability, and best uses of common sewing materials. And, perhaps best of all, when you need it most, Martha and her talented team of crafts editors offer you the reassurance that you really can make it yourself.
 
The projects are as delightful as they are imaginative, and include classic Roman shades, hand-drawn stuffed animals, an easy upholstered blanket chest, a quilted crib bumper, French knot-embellished pillowcases and sheets, and Japanese-embroidered table linens, among many others.With gorgeous color photographs as well as expert instruction, this handy guide will surely encourage beginners and keep sewers and crafters of all experience levels wonderfully busy for many years to come.

© 2014 Martha Stewart Living Magazine / Potter Craft · Reproduced with permission.

Instructions

  1. How to make a drying rack. Heirloom Tomato Pincushions - Step 1 1

    Cut a rectangle of fabric on the bias that's twice as long as it is wide (the yellow tomato-3 1/8-inch [8cm] diameter when finished- required a 10-by-5-inch [25.5cm x 12.5cm] piece). With the fabric facing right-side up, fold it in half as shown, and join the ends with a 1/4- inch (6mm) seam allowance. Sew a running stitch around the top edge; tightly pull the thread to cinch the fabric, and secure with a few backstitches.

  2. How to make a drying rack. Heirloom Tomato Pincushions - Step 2 2

    Turn the pouch right-side out. Stuff with fill (cotton is firmer than polyester). Sew a running stitch around the open end; pull the thread to cinch the fabric. Tack it shut with a few stitches, and knot. To flatten, double-thread the embroidery needle with the perle cotton, and pull it through the "core" a few times. Mimic a tomato's fluted details by wrapping the thread around the cushion and back through the core several times. Knot the thread at the top to finish.

  3. How to make a drying rack. Heirloom Tomato Pincushions - Step 3 3

    For an heirloom-style tomato, cut a circle of fabric (the red one-3 1/2-inch [9cm] diameter when finished-required a 10-inch [25.5cm] diameter circles). With the fabric wrong-side up, hand-sew a running stitch around the perimeter. Place batting in the center of the fabric and gather the fabric into a pouch around it. Stuff with more batting, then pull the thread to cinch; tack with fluted stitches and knot. Flatten the cushion and apply details, as described in step 2.




  4. How to make a drying rack. Heirloom Tomato Pincushions - Step 4 4

    For the cap, draw a 6-pointed star (see photo 4) onto green felt with a disappearing-ink fabric pen, and cut it out. Using a needle threaded with a single length of perle cotton, sew and knot a loop onto the cap. Glue the cap to the top of the pincushion.

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