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Cost
$ $ $ $ $
Difficulty
• • • • •
Time
2h00

Creative Makers: Simple Sewing with Lola Nova
When I was young, my family and I lived along a winding river, our house tucked up on a hillside in the woods. I remember that all of my free time was spent wandering those woods. I knew every trail, every secret spot,
and every place that the wild flowers grew. I would come home from my adventures with my arms full and decorate our house with flowers in every nook and cranny. I love these Pockets Full of Posies made from linen and bits of vintage finery – perfect for wild flowers. They also make wonderful storage for pens, pencils or paintbrushes in a workspace.

Posted by Octopus Publishing Published See Octopus Publishing's 53 projects » © 2019 Alexandra Smith / Mitchell Beazley · Reproduced with permission.
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  • Step 1

    Prepare the pattern pieces
    Cut one 25 x 18cm (10 x 7in) rectangle each from the
    linen, cotton and interfacing. These will become the vase.
    Cut one 8 x 18cm (3 x 7in) rectangle each from the linen,
    cotton and interfacing. These will become the handle.
    In this example, I cut a corner triangle from a vintage linen
    napkin for embellishment. You could use a sweet vintage
    hankie, a bit of doily, embroidery, ribbon and buttons…
    anything that strikes your fancy, really.
    Following the manufacturer’s instructions, fuse the
    corresponding interfacing to the wrong side of each of
    your lining pieces, then set aside.

  • How to sew a fabric planter. Pockets Full Of Posies - Step 2
    Step 2

    Embellish the piece
    Take your large linen rectangle and your embellishments;
    choose one long edge to be the top of your fabric vase and
    sew the embellishments to your linen piece. Set aside.

  • How to sew a fabric planter. Pockets Full Of Posies - Step 3
    Step 3

    Sew the handle
    Place the smaller linen and lining pieces right sides
    together, matching raw edges. Pin in place. Stitch around
    three sides with a 1cm (3/8 in) seam allowance, leaving one
    narrow end of the rectangle open. Trim the seam allowance
    and clip the corners. Turn the handle right side out and
    press. Top-stitch 5mm (¼in) around the 3 sewn edges.

    Create a buttonhole centred on the sewn end of the handle,
    the appropriate size for your button.

  • Step 4

    Sew the outer vase
    To create the vase, take your embellished linen rectangle
    and fold it in half, short sides matching and right sides
    together. Pin. Stitch along the raw edges taking a 1cm
    (3/8 in) seam allowance. Press the seam open and fold the
    vase in order to centre the seam. This seam will be the
    back of your vase.

  • How to sew a fabric planter. Pockets Full Of Posies - Step 5
    Step 5

    Stitch along the bottom edge of your piece using a
    1cm (3/8 in) seam allowance. Clip the corners and press
    the seam open.

  • How to sew a fabric planter. Pockets Full Of Posies - Step 6
    Step 6

    This next stage is a little like origami and can seem a bit
    tricky if you have never done boxed corners before; just
    take a deep breath and let it come naturally. Working with
    the bottom seam of the vase, pinch/pull the corners into
    triangles, making sure they are even and centred, then
    press the triangles so they are nice and crisp. You want to
    fold the bottom of your vase into a kind of square, making
    sure everything is centred properly, as shown.

  • How to sew a fabric planter. Pockets Full Of Posies - Step 7
    Step 7

    Using a pencil or fabric marker, make a mark 2.5cm (1in)
    in from the corners on the bottom seam on both ends.
    Using a straight edge or quilter’s ruler, draw a line through
    your markings.

  • Step 8

    Secure your triangles with pins and stitch along the lines
    you have drawn. Trim off the excess of the triangle near
    the stitch line and press.

    TIP
    Use a rolled up hand towel inside tight spaces to help
    with pressing.

  • Step 9

    Sew the lining
    Take your large interfaced lining rectangle and fold it in
    half, with short sides matching and right sides together.
    Pin. Stitch along the raw edges with a 1cm (3/8 in) seam
    allowance, making sure to leave a 5cm (2in) opening in
    the seam for turning.

    Continue sewing the lining piece, following step 4
    instructions for the outer vase. Turn right side out.

  • How to sew a fabric planter. Pockets Full Of Posies - Step 10
    Step 10

    Finish the vase
    With the outer vase the wrong side out, centre the handle
    inside on the back seam, matching the raw edges. Pin and
    tack in place.

  • How to sew a fabric planter. Pockets Full Of Posies - Step 11
    Step 11

    Tuck the lining, with the right side out, into the outer
    vase, aligning the back seams and matching the raw
    edges. Pin the lining in place. Stitch 1cm (3/8 in) around
    the raw edges.

  • How to sew a fabric planter. Pockets Full Of Posies - Step 12
    Step 12

    Turn the vase the right side out through the lining
    opening. Stitch the opening closed using your preferred
    method. Tuck the lining down into the outer vase and
    press it neatly.

  • How to sew a fabric planter. Pockets Full Of Posies - Step 13
    Step 13

    Measure and mark approx. 9cm (3½in) down from the
    top of the vase on the back seam.

  • How to sew a fabric planter. Pockets Full Of Posies - Step 14
    Step 14

    Stitch your button in place on the mark.

  • How to sew a fabric planter. Pockets Full Of Posies - Step 15
    Step 15

    Place a jam jar, glass bottle, or other waterproof vessel
    inside the fabric shell and you have your finished fabric
    wall vase! Using a curtain or towel rod attached to the
    wall, hang your vase by the handle and button up. Use
    2 or 3 in a row for a dramatic effect. All that is left to do
    is to fill your vase with some lovely flowers and enjoy!

  • How to sew a fabric planter. Pockets Full Of Posies - Step 16
    Step 16

    Variation
    If you would like to make a posy vase to hang on a hook
    instead of a curtain rod, bypass making the handle and
    replace it with a length of ribbon folded into a loop. Attach
    it in the same way you would the handle (see step 6). (k)
    …and Ta Da

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