Worried about my future...

Well, long story short, because of my health problems and being hyper sensitive to smells, I cannot become a vet, which was my lifelong dream job. Now I feel like I have nothing to work for and I'm going to fail my chemistry IGCSE exam in June if I don't get motivated REALLY quickly.

I've been looking at other options but my father won't pay for a course which isn't a "real degree" and none of my other options fit his description of that. My other choices are complementary therapies, animal behaviour and welfare, fashion design and Gaelic or Celtic studies. My father refuses to pay for any of those because according to him they are useless and will get me nowhere in life. I know he has good intentions, he wants me to live a good life, but he's going about it the wrong way and it's putting a tremendous amount of stress on me.

I really don't know what to do anymore.. I feel like there's no point in living anymore because I've wanted to study veterinary medicine for as long as I could remember. I'm busy with my AS-Levels at the moment but my dad knows that if I don't have anything to work for, I am going to drop out of school at the end of the year instead of finishing A-Levels. I need to find a motivation fast because if I'm not motivated, I won't make it through the year's school work.

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11 replies since 14th April 2011 • Last reply 14th April 2011

Maybe you could get your degree and get a job teaching people the skills they need to become a vet?

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You could become a college professor of vetinary studies, since you so you obviously enjoy it!
If I were you, I would find a job so I could attempt to fund myself through college. Would your dad be willing to compromise? Pay half if you went into a "useless" job and you will pay the rest?
Don't give up on being a vet though, there has to be a way to make it work. What way's can you get around the smell and health problems?

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There aren't ways to work around the health problems, and I can't study veterinary medicine at all because I need to do practicals, which I won't be able to do.

And I've been trying to get a job since I turned 16 almost 2 years ago. It's against the law in most places here to hire white people so we can't get jobs anywhere.

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well if you took celtic studyies you could go into education or work in meseaums as a curator

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Have you spoke with your day about what he considers a good job? Perhaps he has some ideas that you haven't thought of. There's always the possibility of getting some schooling for a job you kinda (such as office admin, etc) like to support yourself while you consider your other options for the rest of your life.

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Rawr Rawr-life never happens in straight lines and we can never relive it once we've been at any point.

You have chosen your A-levels.Think of them as a passport to whatever future you end up in.Work with your teachers to show your maximum potential.

Make sure your share with your tutors your voluntary work here- hosting a swap on going swap is a great life experience and a commitment.Will hold you in good stead for references and life hobbies.

I found it so frustrating when a student gave up on my courses.
Just seemed like a wasted opportunity to lose them from the class.

We're actually beginning to plan a gap year full of experience rather that qualifications for our teen.

Ever thought of becoming a plumber or electrician their highly paid and help people and animals every day.Float that past you Dad!

Get those A-level's they are the first door to a good life.

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I think I understand a bit what you're feeling.

I'm college bound next year, and the past 2 years I've been working towards the dream of becoming a makeup artist, but that didn't work out, and then an art historian, but again, not going to work out (due to the lack of jobs in my area). So I'm going to try to become a nurse/dermatologist.

I've decided that I'm NOT going to give up on my dream to work with makeup (and do some free lancing work) and I'm espically not going to quit learning about art.

I know this might not help (it really wasn't what I wanted to hear at all) but maybe get a degree, find a job, and then sometime down the road, get a degree in what you want to learn?

In the mean time, you can still learn about what you want to learn about (such as with the therpies, and the fashion, and the language studies, and the animal behavior).

Don't ever lose the passion for something you truly love.
It'll find its way into your life somehow.

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hey it took me years to figure out what I was good at, ten after taking my course it took me two years to get a job. Its not easy out there.

I have a cousin who spent about 14 years in college to become a Doctor, only to fail at the last exam(she got her doctorate) but cannot pratice medicen because she fail the oral exam.
so now she has a part time job in a lab working with people who only have a BSC. Bacholr of science.

You can map out your whole life, but it may never fully work out.

I on the other hand, wanted to study fine art, my family said now so I did Contempory history to become a teacher-only to suck BIG TIME AT it and flunk out. So then I spent years doing odd jobs, like a nanny, waitress and retail to stumble upon a Graphic Design diploma course.

in the end I did end up working in the creative industry. I now exibit my photography all over Canada, I have traveled the world(working-not vacation) and have a great career.

I started my Design corse when I was 25. Didn't get my design job till I turned 29.

my advice, do what you love. when there is a will, there is a way

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I'm sure your parents only want what's best for you, so don't be disheartened....concentrate on getting good results in your A levels, as Debs says, this lays down the pathways to whatever choice you eventually make.

I worked in Veterinary Medicine myself, as a research microbiologist, so perhaps you could consider something like that?
In my spare time, I also helped out ( volunarily) in the wardrobe department of the Scottish Ballet, repairing costumes etc., made jewellery and bags to sell at monthly craft fairs , and joined plenty of arts, crafts and literary groups too. If I hadn't had a fairly well paid job, I wouldn't have been able to indulge in all my hobbies...work is only a small part of your life, after all, and where I live, the better job you get, the more free time and extra money you will have.
Have you asked your Dad exactly what careers he does approve of?

@ Michelle...working in a lab with people who "only have a BSc"( i.e. me!) can be fun and rewarding!!!

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not for my cousin, she really wants to be a doctor. I don't have my degree finished, but I am already head of design. You have to love what you do, to do good.

Plus I mentioned my cousin that as a way to say that you don't need to have a Doctorate to get a good job

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If you have good teachers they will help you work around allegires for practicals which is what I am going to have to do tthis summer for my Anatomy and Physiology 2 class {they disect a cat and I am highly allergic}

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