Barmy British Whatsits, anyone?

Lovelies,

I have this long-time fascination for British slang. You know: Gorgy, Brill, Ace, Barmy, How's your uncle?, lippy, etc. Its just lovely!

My question is this: Do you think it is utterly pathetic for an American to use Brit. slang in everyday conversations? Or fun?

If you have a favorite British slang word, add that too!

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40 replies since 23rd December 2010 • Last reply 23rd December 2010

well I lived in Ireland, so the words just added into my everyday vocab

I used skint alot(no money)

I use massive alot too

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lol I had a lot of British frends when I was a teen and their slang totally rubbed off on me. I don't use slang very often but you're more likely to hear me use British slang than American slang. I do often have to stop and give definitions of words I use but that's not very different from every day conversation with me. Sadly my vocabulary stretches beyond most average Americans.

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Um it's actually Bob's your uncleHappy
I think if stuff just slips into everyday conversation it's fine. It's when it sounds forced, or like people are trying hard to be cool or obscure that it doesn't sound right.

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thats true Laurel

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It sounds better when you have the legit English accent, which American's lack.
Brit slang sounds too fake coming out of an American's mouth. I once heard a girl call another girl a chav, and I was like "Hold up, she's not a chav, and why are you calling her one?"

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this is interesting to a real Brit! i grew up with lots of rhyming slang so 'apples and pears' was stairs - but you just said 'apples' so go up the apples and fetch the hairdryer (or whatever) Barnet is short for Barnet fair meaning hair - ie get your Barnet done, plates of meat - feet, China plates - mates (friends) etc etc - will try and think of some more!

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skint, brassic,(poor!) Cary Packered - knackered (v tired!) gobsmacked (lost for words) over the moon (ecstatic), sick as a parrot (usually meaning really unhappy or upset about something) as opposed to sick as a dog (literally sick...;( )loved up (in love!) Cream crackered (see cary packered) sweet (as a nut) used a lot at the moment, minted - in the money? - not sure, and each generation brings its own new language. Half inched - pinched (stole) rosy lea - cup of tea, ........ my delightful twins see picture - now aged 12 insist on describing something overwhelmingly brilliant as SICK - how enchanting is that!!!????

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and looking at the very first post its 'Hows your father' as in ' so i saw barry and joanne getting up to hows your father behind the bike shed... '
Bobs your uncle means that everything will work out well.
The correct response to 'Bobs your Uncle' is 'and Fannys your aunt!"

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I'm with Tina, this is interesting to a Brit. Erm, I guess I wouldn't mind an American using Brit slang, but I guess it would sound odd, like a Brit using American slang.

Speaking of cockney rhyming slang, I don't use much of it, but I'll always have a butchers at something!! Which is short for a Butchers Hook meaning to look

I can't think of any other slang to add... to us it's just normal talk, so I can't really think of anything that would stand out to others Tongue

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And for the how's your uncle... LOL I'm not sure what you meant... but like Laurel said, I'm not sure if you meant

Bob's your Uncle

OR

How's your father -- to have a little "how's your father" basically means s.e.x

It's hard trying to explain what all the little bits of slang mean, so I just found this pretty good website you could check out...

http://www.effingpot.com/slang.shtml

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And for the how's your uncle... LOL I'm not sure what you meant... but like Laurel said, I'm not sure if you meant

Bob's your Uncle

OR

How's your father -- to have a little "how's your father" basically means s.e.x

It's hard trying to explain what all the little bits of slang mean, so I just found this pretty good website you could check out...

http://www.effingpot.com/slang.shtml

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And for the how's your uncle... LOL I'm not sure what you meant... but like Laurel said, I'm not sure if you meant

Bob's your Uncle

OR

How's your father -- to have a little "how's your father" basically means s.e.x

It's hard trying to explain what all the little bits of slang mean, so I just found this pretty good website you could check out...

http://www.effingpot.com/slang.shtml

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Well I feel a right fool. "How's your uncle?!" Anyway, thanks for the fantastic input, everyone! I learned loads of new slang words. I suppose that this predicament leaves me 2 choices:
1)Move to England and pick up a British accent/vocabulary
2)Go on living in my British Bubble and spread the madness
3)All of the above
(Opps, thats 3.)

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Haha as a Brit now living in Canada I often use British slang unknowingly and people look at me like I am crazy a lot.

I love how over here people use the term "Fanny pack" Tongue Clue - fanny = front bottom in British terms ;)

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