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Recycled fabric/paper that can be used in so many ways
Great way of recycling to make unique handmade crafts.It can be stitched,stamped or embossed.
Your imagination is your only limitation

Posted by Essex Debs from Bellevue, Washington, United States • Published See Essex Debs's 30 projects »
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  • How to make a fabric. Papercloth - Step 1
    Step 1

    Papercloth is fun to make but slow to dry.
    Step 1 choose back ground fabric.
    I cut sheets to fit in Super B size box (upcycled from hubby's prints)
    This green was created when I embraced the grey last year and dyed all my white summer shirts green threw in some old sheeting too :)

  • How to make a fabric. Papercloth - Step 2
    Step 2

    Place paper on a waterproof background Freezer paper or a tenflon sheet work well.Parchemnt paper works at a pinch.You will want to be able to remove this at the end.
    Begin to load fabric with found paper.

  • How to make a fabric. Papercloth - Step 3
    Step 3

    Continue to add layers of paper until your happy.

  • How to make a fabric. Papercloth - Step 4
    Step 4

    Next to get messy.Apply liberal amounts of 1/2 strength glue.Everything needs to be soaked through.This is the holding layer so make sure you check it's all gooey

  • How to make a fabric. Papercloth - Step 5
    Step 5

    I make this in batches.So here we have 3 different green themed sheets.
    You could add glitter or embossing powder at this stage.
    I sprinkled on pencil shavings

    Hard part LET IT DRY

  • How to make a fabric. Papercloth - Step 6
    Step 6

    Now you have custom made cloth with you can use for any purpose.
    Enjoy !

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Comments

Essex Debs
Essex Debs · Bellevue, Washington, US · 32 projects

1 part glue diluted with 2 parts water i.e. one cap glue and 2 caps of water.
I use cheap 1 1/2" brushes .I don't like foam ones as they tend to snap.
One of the things I've found is that tissue can bleed so I work from light to dark and wash in warm soapy water and rinse well

Reply
Dragoness
Dragoness · Surrey, England, GB · 28 projects

is 1/2 strength glue half water half glue? and did u put it on with a brush?

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Libby W.
Libby W. · Castle, Wales, GB · 78 projects

I think this fabric would make a great picnic blanket.

Reply
Essex Debs
Essex Debs · Bellevue, Washington, US · 32 projects

Yes- Jet you just glue it down with lots of glue.
Pretty similar to your techniques using netting
Hand washing would probably be OK it can easily be wiped down.Really depends on how through the gluing is.If this was really important I would suggest applying glue to the underside when dry and then you would have a sealed fabric.

FYI I did this this week with a colored base cloth and turned it good side down work a treat

Reply
Jet H.
Jet H. · Haarlem, North-Holland, Netherlands · 108 projects

thank you for the great tute, so you glue the the paper on fabric?
love it, thank you for sharing this!!!;-D
about not washable, perhaps when you use other kinds of glue and giving it a finish coat on it it can be hand wash.
I have done that with other not normal experiments with glue;-D

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Sally M.
Sally M. · Orlando, Florida, US · 29 projects

so cool debs! thanks for sharing this great how-to!

Reply
Essex Debs
Essex Debs · Bellevue, Washington, US · 32 projects

Yep you can sew it-Great for totes and small bags-just not washable.Sure you won't need interfacing
Is stiff but machining it fine.If I hand-sewn I make holes first saves my thumbs :)

Reply
Pam ^_^
Pam ^_^ · Pocatello, Idaho, US · 316 projects

hey debs, When its all dry can you just cut and sew like normal? Is it stiffer or hard and also If I made some and wanted to use it to make a tote, do you think I'd still need to use interfacing?

Either way I think this is such a great idea, thanks for sharing with us <3

Reply
Essex Debs
Essex Debs · Bellevue, Washington, US · 32 projects

Should have said this was inspired by Stitch Alchemy - Keri Perkins and article by Beryl Taylor in first edition of Cloth Scissors Paper

Reply