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$ $ $ $ $
Difficulty
• • • • •
Time
50 mins

How To: Cloth Pads and Pantyliners
Tonight I'm going to talk about something that isn't talked about very often. Women seem to think it's shameful and gross, and yet we all do it once a month. Yup, you got it - menstruation. Hey, it's Lingerie Month, and we've all gotta protect our precious underwear once a month, so why not talk about it?

I won a giveaway last year during the May Day Giveaway at Sew Mama Sew. The prize was two cloth pantyliners from HoneyBee Hill. I was pregnant at the time, but I promised to give them a try when my cycle started going again. I admit, I'm a disposable type of girl, and cloth pads didn't appeal to me.

So imagine my surprise when I found that they weren't terrible.

Here are a few of the benefits I've found:
- Another way to become more eco-friendly is a plus
- saves on money. They're re-usable after washing.
- always accessible even in the middle of the night when you don't feel like running to the drugstore
- comfy - no plastic-y hot feeling. They're breathable.
- I love to have a back up when I think my period is going to start, but don't feel like wearing plastic all day just in case

These aren't your grandmother's rags! We have advanced A LOT in the design of underwear and now have easy to wear, snap closed cloth pads with wings! :)

Here's how to make your own:

Supplies needed:
I used entirely upcycled fabrics for my example. I figure if I'm going to be green, might as well do it up right.

Posted by Tawny B. from Canada • Published See Tawny B.'s 20 projects »
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  • Step 1

    Make your pattern

    - the pattern is simple. The first piece is basically an oval. The length is 8 inches and the width is 6.5 inches. Connect the dots in an oval shape and you've got the first piece.
    - the second piece is for the cloth pad (you don't need this piece if you're just making the pantyliners). It's 7 inches by 2.5 inches. Round off the ends a bit.

  • How to make a panty liner. Cloth Pads And Pantyliners - Step 2
    Step 2

    Cut out your pieces
    - for the cloth pad, cut the first piece out once of fleece and once in cotton, linen or raw silk. These are natural fibres that will be absorbent and easily laundered over and over again. Cut the second piece out in fleece, terrycloth, or anything else you can find that is super absorbent. I cut this out three times and layered them to make it my desired thickness. You can cut out the thickness you prefer.

  • How to make a panty liner. Cloth Pads And Pantyliners - Step 3
    Step 3

    Layer the pieces together
    - place the bottom fleece wrong side up on the table. Put your absorbent pieces in the middle lengthwise. Place your cotton main piece on the top, wrong side down. Pin the absorbent layers in place.
    - if making a pantyliner only, then you just layer the two main pieces wrong sides together

  • How to make a panty liner. Cloth Pads And Pantyliners - Step 4
    Step 4

    Sew the cloth pad together
    - Select a small zigzag stitch on your machine. Sew down both sides of the absorbent layers. This will form the pad part.
    - using the same zigzag stitch, sew around the outer edge of the pad. Trim off excess.
    - if sewing the pantyliner, just zigzag around the entire outer edge of the pad and trim off excess.
    ** you can also serge around the edge to make a nice finished edge

  • How to make a panty liner. Cloth Pads And Pantyliners - Step 5
    Step 5

    Attach snaps
    - I've upcycled my snaps, so I've placed them in the correct position on the wings and sewed them on.
    - You can also attach the snaps using the instructions on the package they came in.

    Now go make some more!

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Comments

Ravenway
Ravenway · , , United States

I know you made this a while ago...but I just wanted to say thanks for sharing it. Found out about these on a website last night and if you buy them they're so expensive! like $25 just for a trial and full sets close to $100. So if I decide to try it out since I want to save money and be more green I'll be using this tutorial :D

Reply
Rayne S.
Rayne S. · New York, New York, New York

I'm allergic to latex but in the past had no choice but to use them anyway and deal with the pain. I'm going to make these for myself and see how they work. Thanks so much.

Reply
Rayne S.
Rayne S. · New York, New York, New York

I'm allergic to latex but in the past had no choice but to use them anyway and deal with the pain. I'm going to make these for myself and see how they work. Thanks so much.

Reply
Dragoness
Dragoness · Surrey, England, GB · 28 projects

wow i want to do this. i dont use a mooncup or tampon though, never got used to the feeling of them inside me.

Reply
Tawny B.
Tawny B. · Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada · 20 projects

If you use them full time, then you'll have to change them more often then you would for the plastic manufactured type. If using them in combination with a menstrual cup, then you won't have a problem. You can soak them before you throw them in the wash with a little vinegar or baking soda added to control the odor. :)

Reply
KatieLikeMe
KatieLikeMe · Indianapolis, Indiana, United States · 48 projects

Don't they produce a smell, though?

Reply
Tawny B.
Tawny B. · Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada · 20 projects

You can soak them until you do wash next. Throw them in the wash a little bit wet to get rid of most stains. They are super absorbent depending on what materials you use (bamboo, cotton, PUL etc) but you'll want to change them often because they don't have that manufactured benefit of absorbing odor as well.

Reply
Sweet Nothings
Sweet Nothings · Deaths waiting room, Australia, Australia · 1 project

just a question about cleaning ect. Do you just soak them in cold water overnight? and how are they at absorbency do you need to change them often?

Reply
Krystyl O.
Krystyl O. · Abbotsford, BC, Canada · 11 projects

this is awesome !! In highschool, we made these for women's prisons in Africa - where during their 'time of the month' they are tied to trees out side of the prison. - Also, very Earth friendly, ... not to mention wallet friendly.

Reply
*~*{Kelley}*~*
*~*{Kelley}*~* · St. Louis, Breckenridge Hills, United States

I love this idea! And I agree that it will be VERY eco friendly! I'm definatly gonna have to try these!! And!! You gave me a great way to use those stained or torn baby clothes my boys have outgrown!

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