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Giveaway!

This giveaway has closed.

Winners:
Gaby R.

Sample Projects

Knitted Pearls

Knitted Pearls

A knitted tube expands and contracts to form these silken pearls.

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Meet the Author

Hey there, can you introduce yourself?

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Sure! I'm Daniel Yuhas. I've been knitting for over 20 years now, and still feel like I'm just getting warmed up. I teach at knitting festivals and my local yarn shops here in Portland, and my first book of knitting designs just came out, all about Knitting from the Cente Out.


Tell us a bit about the book?

The challenge I set for myself in this book was to see how many projects I could come up with that are knit from the center out - so there's quite a variety. Socks, hats, toys, sweaters, toys, knitted jewelry, you name it! Each one explores the center-out theme in some different way.


What was the inspiration behind it?

I got totally obsessed with all the design possibilities of center-out knitting when I made a baby blanket for my first niece. That blanket was divided into eight parts, and as soon as the blanket was done I had a toy octopus on my needles. One idea kept following the next and before I knew it I had a book on my hands.


Which is your favourite project?

The Sunflower Shawl. Norah Gaughan's awesome book Knitting Nature got me obsessed with phyllotaxis, the natural shapes that plants take as they grow, and this one is an exploration of that theme. I had dreams about it as the design came together.


What is your craft space like?

Knitting is a super portable craft, so my making space is wherever I happen to be at the moment - the subway, the bus, my couch, or the shops I teach at. I've usually got a circular needle around my neck like a pair of reading glasses, and I tend to leave a trail of stitch markers wherever I go. My partner and I share a creative office space where I write, but a big chunk of my book was written in the Rose room of the New York Public Library - that majestic space really focused me.


Have you always been creative?

I guess so!


When did you first start crafting?

I grew up in a super-crafty family. My mother was into basketry and my grandfather was an amazing woodworker, so I've been making things as long as I can remember. My first successful knitting project was an army green and burnt orange striped acrylic scarf I made my first year in college - it kind of hurts my current fashion sense to remember it, but hey, it was the nineties!


Who are your crafty heroes?

Katharine Cobey, who believes in taking ourselves seriously and knitting "no holds barred," Anna Zilboorg, whose Knitting for Anarchists rocked my world, Helle Jorgensen, Norah Gaughan, Jess Polka and Hansi Singh, each of whom got me excited about craft as a creative practice, Paul Jackson and Chris Palmer from the world of origami, the list goes on...


Where do find inspiration?

I'm a technique and idea junkie, so I'm constantly trying new moves and figuring out where they'll fit into my design work. Sometimes it starts from a really abstract place - I'll learn something new or have a new obsession of some kind, and try to use my knitting to explore that idea. Many of my favorite projects started out in the mistake pile, or sat around in my idea box for months until the design finally "clicked."


What's next for you?

I've been super excited to be teaching workshops all over the US since the book came out, and I'll be doing a lot of that over the coming year. And of course I'll keep designing and writing. I'm gearing up for the next big thing, but not sure what shape that'll take yet.

Publisher's Description

In Knitting from the Center Out, Daniel Yuhas teaches knitters the fascinating technique of starting a project with just a few stitches and knitting outward, in revolutions (or circles). The book features 28 mesmerizing projects, ranging from baby blankets and lace shawls to sweaters and stuffed toys, and also includes tutorials for the minimal skills required for center-out knitting, such as special cast-ons, increases, and decreases. Throughout the book are enlightening explanations of the underlying math and the architecture of the flat and dimensional shapes. Clear instructions and beautiful photography and illustrations assure that knitters of all levels and inclinations—whether they are technique junkies or not—will want to have this book.

Praise for Knitting From the Center Out:

“Though he delivers almost thirty projects in this premiere volume, Yuhas is just warming up. We'll be hearing more from him: Someday we'll look back and say, this is the book that launched a thousand cone hats.” —Vogue Knitting

“We love the sorting hat . . . You can be the Gryffindor of your dreams. . . . He has figured out the science . . . and we can all benefit from that.” —Knitcircus podcast

“So I commend Yuhas for writing a ‘revolutionary,’ original book with lots of good new ideas that will give new and experienced knitters alike lots of challenges and pleasure. The book retails for about $28, which comes out to $1 per pattern; well worth the price. This is a Melanie Falick Book from STC Craft. I have to say, Melanie picked another winner with this one.” —MyCentralJersey.com

“The best part about this book was the section ‘Tutorials.’ Hey, if you are like me and get stuck on a pattern for days, it is nice to have step by step instructions + pictures.” —Sweetly Made (Just for You)

“I would everyone to check it out. I like this guy [author Daniel Yuhas]. I like his voice. I felt a kinship.” —Knit Knit Cafe

“The patterns are killer, lovely and unusual all in one. The Half-Moon Mittens, Heel-Up Socks and Tree of Life Afghan are must knits for me. The Leaf-Yoke Sweater is so spectacular that I show the pattern to every knitter that comes to my house saying, ‘Let’s knit this!’” —Knitty.com


“I was sent an advanced copy of the book Knitting from the Center Out by Daniel Yuhas and can I just say Holy Wowza! (Yeah, sometimes being a craft blogger has its perks!) This book is pretty awesome.” —Smashed Peas and Carrots blog

“This book should be required reading, just to expand your own knitting repertoire. The more you know and understand knitting, the easier it is to express yourself.” —Examiner.com

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